Monday, April 23, 2012

Slowly The Truth Comes Out

Accurate and telling information is slowly coming out concerning the U.S. Secret Service (USSS) incident in Columbia and it is quite instructive.  And apparently $800.00 a night is not the going rate for a lady of the evening in Cartagena, as I surmised.

WaPo April 22, 2012 by William Booth
Cartagena’s Night Life Spelled Trouble For Secret Service
Jimena said the prepago system was good business, for both client and service provider. To go to a room in the back of the Isis costs $100. To go to a hotel for the night would be $350, she explained, gratuities welcome.


Also of interest is that though the media is ripe with alleged details of all sorts of shenanigans by the USSS agents and officers, as well as members of the military, only one of the girls involved has been interviewed and she has disappeared. And, as pointed out earlier, did not know the agents were USSS.

The taxi drivers who work the clubs say any prostitutes who went with any of the American agents are hiding from the media and authorities. The alleged prostitute at the center of the case, who gave a single interview, to the New York Times, has left her home, her attorney said. Her picture was published in the New York Daily News from images taken from Facebook.

So, after some supposed investigation where the girls involved have not been interviewed, the USSS is taking personnel action?  Not a recipe for success, as one attorney has pointed out.

Even more important is that it appears that Dania Suarez may not have been completely honest in her interview with the NYT and entrapped a luckless USSS agent.

The latest phenomenon in Cartagena prostitution is the system called “prepago,” or pre-payment, and it is designed to avoid the very kind of early-morning fee dispute that investigators say occurred in a hallway of the Hotel Caribe on April 12, when a U.S. officer from a Secret Service advance team and the woman who spent the night with him argued, loudly, which eventually attracted hotel security and Colombian police and prompted a call to the U.S. Embassy.

It is clear she wasn't practicing prepago and the likelyhood that the agent, as he was in a night club and she was in undoubtedly something slinky, was just a woman of loose morals, like Sandra Fluke.  Being up front about things is an honest practice, as opposed to loudly demanding money in a hotel hallway.

But more important is that the USSS manager on site in Columbia was an apparent lesbian, not that there is anything wrong with that, with a racial grievance to grind against the white power structure.

WaPo April 21, 2012
Secret Service Scandal: Rising Supervisor Set Uncovering Of Misconduct In Motion
Paula Reid, the new Secret Service boss for the South American region, was in Cartagena preparing for the president’s visit when she received an urgent report: A prostitute, upset because she had not been paid by a Secret Service agent, had created a disturbance in a nearby hotel, knocking on doors and yelling in the hallways at daybreak.
With roughly 24 hours left until President Obama was due to arrive in the Colombian town, the 46-year-old Calvert County native instructed her staff to swoop into the Hotel Caribe at midday April 12 and inspect hotel registration records for all Secret Service employees. Reid, who had been staying at a nearby hotel, swiftly rounded up 11 agents and officers and ordered them out of the country. She alerted her superiors that she found early evidence of “egregious” misconduct involving prostitutes and set in motion the public uncovering of the most wide-reaching scandal at the agency in decades, according to government officials involved in the case.


All fine and dandy, a female Untouchable.  


Those who know Reid said the move revealed a steely resolve that has marked her 21-year rise through the ranks of an agency whose macho reputation has again come under scrutiny. Her story offers a counterbalance to critics who contend the Secret Service has been slow to clean up its act from the “Mad Men”-era days when some agents joked that their off-duty mantra was “wheels up, rings off.”
Not that Reid, an intensely private person, would admit it. In an interview, she offered few new details of her role, sticking to what colleagues described as her businesslike approach.

Until further in we get the Al Sharpton wannabe angle:


After growing up in Calvert County, Reid graduated from the University of Maryland. She joined the Secret Service at age 25 after visiting an NAACP job fair that sought to encourage minority applicants for law enforcement jobs.
According to a promotional interview years later that Reid granted to help recruit more female agents, she studied criminal justice in college and was debating whether to go to law school or become an investigator when she chose the service.
“I can’t imagine not being in law enforcement,” she said then, according to the interview, published in an online newsletter, Women for Hire.
Reid’s time in the agency has not been rosy throughout.
Ten years after entering the service at the bottom rung, she joined as a plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit that claimed the agency engaged in racial discrimination against African American personnel. She provided a declaration giving examples of ways black agents were relegated to lesser assignments. In the broader suit, some of the plaintiffs contended that senior managers had often used racial epithets to describe criminal suspects but were not reprimanded for their comments.
She eventually withdrew from the case, which continues but has since dwindled to a smaller number of plaintiffs. Still, as a black woman, Reid stood out in a mostly white-male agency.

An wracist ambalance chaser but not even a successful one, or perhaps they bought her off with undeserved promotions.  But she clearly has it in for the man, the white man. 

So, in the end, we have some randy soldiers and agents, nothing one does not expect from alpha males, trying to pick up girls at a nightclub and a large group drinking a couple of bottles of vodka.  

Usually white bull lesbians are good to work with in law enforcement, they think themselves just one of the guys and there is no sexual tension.  But bring in a three-fer, and all you have is trouble and grievance mongering.  And someone with an agenda, getting back at those who oppressed her.

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